Accession Number:

ADA517513

Title:

Purple Virtues: A Leadership Cure for Unhealthy Rivalry

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

AIR UNIV MAXWELL AFB AL

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2001-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Joint operations are the rule, not the exception, for the U.S. military. Why then do interservice rivalries seem to work against the services becoming more joint Colonel Ash proposes that the lack of a recognized set of common core virtues is the root of the problem. He suggests that the tenets of West Points motto Duty, Honor, Country are these common, purple virtues. The most capable military in human history cannot afford to suffer from an ethical breakdown. Interservice competition is good and is here to stay, but unhealthy interservice rivalry must end. Presently, the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Marine Corps have different core values. This is dysfunctional. Core values also are limited in effecting joint ethical conduct because values dont go far enough. They are situationally tied to worth and lack a moral domain. Virtues are more appropriate as an ethical bedrock. West Points respected motto Duty, Honor, Country is more closely linked to virtues than values because it has moral implications. What does this have to do with leadership Everything. Ethics begins and ends with leadership -- todays leaders living it and tomorrows leaders believing it. The leaders we need for the 21st century are those with virtue and ethical superiority. Only then can our joint force be joint from the heart.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Psychology
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE