Accession Number:

ADA513871

Title:

Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

Descriptive Note:

Congressional rept.

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2010-01-19

Pagination or Media Count:

12.0

Abstract:

Since 2000, the U.S. military has been building up forward-deployed forces on the U.S. territory of Guam to increase deterrence and power projection for possible responses to crises and disasters, counter-terrorism, and contingencies in support of South Korea, Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, or elsewhere in Asia. The defense buildup on Guam has been moderate. Nonetheless, China has concerns about the defense buildup, suspecting it to be directed against China. Guams role has increased with plans to withdraw some U.S. forces from Japan and South Korea. In 2006, the United States and Japan agreed on a Roadmap to strengthen their alliance, including a buildup on Guam to cost 10.3 billion, with Japan contributing 60. The goals are to start the related construction on Guam by 2010 and to complete relocation of 8,000 marines and their 9,000 dependents from Okinawa to Guam by 2014. On February 17, 2009, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visited Tokyo and signed the bilateral Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Japan Concerning the Implementation of the Relocation of the III Marine Expeditionary Force Personnel and Their Dependents From Okinawa to Guam that reaffirmed the Roadmap of May 1, 2006. The two governments agreed that of the estimated 10.27 billion cost of the facilities and infrastructure development for the relocation, Japan will provide 6.09 billion, including up to 2.8 billion in direct cash contributions in FY2008 dollars. The United States committed to fund 3.18 billion plus about 1 billion for a road.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE