Accession Number:

ADA513309

Title:

Permanent Allies? The Canada-US Defence Relationship in the 21st Century

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

CALGARY UNIV (ALBERTA) CENTRE FOR MILITARY AND STRATEGIC STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

38.0

Abstract:

Canada and the United States have been close defense allies for 70 years. That cooperation has spanned participation in World War Two, the Korean War, the Cold War, the creation and half-century maintenance of a bilateral air defense command NORAD, the first Gulf War, and most recently, the war on terrorism. However, there are indications that the relationship today is weakening. This paper will examine two critical issues -- the 2005 Canadian decision to reject participation in the U.S. missile defense program, and Canadas persistent low level of military expenditures and the effect that low spending has had on the Canadian Forces CF -- that combined suggest a significant decline in the relationship. At the same time, the paper notes that there are some recent positive signs, in particular the current increase in Canadian defense spending and mission in Afghanistan, that indicate a possible improvement, albeit one that may be tied to the electoral prospects of the Conservative government of Stephen Harper, which could face another election as early as this fall. Ultimately, the paper argues that the bilateral defense relationship is essentially a barometer of the larger political one, and a decline in the former is normally reflective of a weakening in the latter.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Antimissile Defense Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE