Accession Number:

ADA512992

Title:

The Campaign of 1777: Examination of a Turning Point Using DIME

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-12-11

Pagination or Media Count:

81.0

Abstract:

This historical assessment of the American Revolution evaluates the significance of the Campaign of 1777. More specifically, the thesis examines whether the Campaign of 1777 was a turning point in the American Revolutionary War, or simply a natural shift in political and military strategies. The thesis defines the Campaign of 1777 as spanning January 6, 1777 through March 14, 1778. Each of the four elements of National Power -- Diplomatic, Informational, Military, and Economic DIME -- are used to determine whether there was a perceptible increase or decrease in power following that campaign. The European balance of power dictated the effectiveness of diplomacy. After the Seven Years War, Britain became diplomatically isolated, which affected force replacement during the Revolution. Furthermore, research indicates that the French were interested in developing an alliance with the Americans as early as 1775, discounting the transformation effects of the Saratoga victory. Both the information and economic elements of power seem to create more impact in historical writing than existed during the campaign. Finally, evidence indicates a perceptible turning point effect in the military element of power. Overall, the research indicates that there was a perceptible increase in the military element of power coupled with a possible increase in diplomatic power for the Americans. Simultaneously, there appear to be indications of a decrease in the military element of power for the British.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science
  • Humanities and History
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE