Accession Number:

ADA512919

Title:

Miniature Biomimetic Acoustic Sensors

Descriptive Note:

Conference paper

Corporate Author:

TORONTO UNIV (ONTARIO) DEPT OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Report Date:

1999-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Stereocilia, Natures fundamental acoustic sensors are found in all hearing living systems. They are located on hair cells in the cochlea. Deflection of stereocilia, induced by shear in the endolymphatic fluid, generates neural impulses. Stereocilia are also found in the lateral line of fish for water flow detection. Even in non-hearing organisms hydra, jellyfish, sea anemones, stereocilia may be present as mechanoreceptors for swimming prey detection plankton. Highly ordered arrays of parallel carbon nanotubes were grown by pyrolysis of acetylene on cobalt within a hexagonal close-packed nanochannel alumina template at 650 degrees Celsius. The nanotubes are characterized by a narrow size distribution, large scale periodicity and high densities. Using this method ordered nanotubes with diameters from 10 nanometers to several hundred nanometers and lengths up to 100 micrometers can be produced. Stereocilia as sensors 1. Miniature microphoneshydrophones 2. Miniature acoustic imaging arrays 3. Micro-flow detectors 4. Shear stress micro-sensors 5. Microscale bio-sound detectors. Stereocilia as actuators 1. Similar to crustaceaninsect stridulatory pegs 2. Micro-SonarSodar emitting arrays, Handheld Sonars, Air-Coupled Acoustic Sensors.

Subject Categories:

  • Biology
  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Electrical and Electronic Equipment
  • Miscellaneous Detection and Detectors
  • Acoustics
  • Bionics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE