Accession Number:

ADA510741

Title:

The U.S.-UK Special Relationship: Past, Present and Future (Conference Brief, May 2005)

Descriptive Note:

Conference summary

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL STRATEGIC STUDIES INST CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2005-05-29

Pagination or Media Count:

5.0

Abstract:

On April 11-13, 2005, the Strategic Studies Institute co-sponsored a conference on The U.S.-UK Special Relationship Past, Present and Future, in cooperation with Dickinson College, and the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom at Shrivenham. The conference was followed by a wrap-up session hosted by the Royal United Services Institute in London. Conference attendees were primarily from the Defence Academy and its associated colleges and research bodies. Among the key insights from the conference are that the U.S.-United Kingdom UK relationship is special, but should not be taken for granted. Like any close relationship, it requires constant conversation and maintenance. While the two nations are very closely related by blood and philosophy, the demographics of both are undergoing significant changes and the older forms of communication may not serve as readily as they did before. The United States, the UK, and the European Union EU form a triangular relationship that simultaneously conditions and threatens the U.S.-UK relationship, as the UK must participate in European affairs. The two most salient issues among the three are those of economics and law. U.S.-UK economic ties are extensive and relatively easily managed whereas U.S.-EU economic connections are somewhat contentious, as recent merger rulings attest. EU legal rulings regarding the use of force have been deemed unacceptable by the United States and potentially threaten coalition Rules of Engagement. The United States and the UK need to attend to the relationship on a regular basis if its special nature is to remain. The United States is perceived by much of the British public as being particularly insensitive to the UKs need to be part of Europe and to be something more than an acquiescent partner for the United States, particularly in the use of force in dealing with international threats.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science
  • Sociology and Law

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE