Accession Number:

ADA510237

Title:

USMC's Lack of Human Intelligence Doctrine

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND QUANTICO VA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-02-20

Pagination or Media Count:

12.0

Abstract:

The Department of Defense interrogation policy has made it difficult for military interrogators to conduct intelligence interrogations in the Global War on Terror. During the Cold War, the practice of intelligence interrogation did not receive nearly the amount of scrutiny it has recently. As long as interrogators and handlers abided by applicable articles in the Geneva Convention, intelligence interrogations during conflicts such as the Balkans, Restore Hope, and Desert Storm went largely unnoticed. During 2004, the second year of Operation Iraqi Freedom, scandal arose in Abu Ghraib Prison outside of Baghdad, putting the art of human intelligence HUMINT collection at the center of international attention. As a result of investigations and Congressional hearings, the US Army has had to redefine the way it conducts HUMINT operations. This change has affected CounterintelligenceHuman Intelligence CIHUMINT Marines who rely on Army publications used for the conduct of HUMINT operations by CounterintelligenceHUMINT Marines. The Marine Corps needs its own HUMINT doctrine so that collectors can conduct HUMINT operations, have clear guidance, and be free from reliance on Army Doctrine.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE