Accession Number:

ADA509840

Title:

U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

Descriptive Note:

Congressional rept.

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-08-03

Pagination or Media Count:

35.0

Abstract:

After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States faced a challenge in enlisting the full support of the Peoples Republic of China PRC in the counterterrorism fight against Al Qaeda. This effort raised short-term policy issues about how to elicit cooperation and how to address PRC concerns about the U.S.-led war Operation Enduring Freedom. Longer-term issues have concerned whether counterterrorism has strategically transformed bilateral ties and whether Chinas support was valuable and not obtained at the expense of other U.S. interests. The extent of U.S.-China counterterrorism cooperation has been limited, but the tone and context of counterterrorism helped to stabilize - even if it did not transformthe closer bilateral relationship pursued by President George Bush since late 2001. Chinas military, the Peoples Liberation Army PLA, has not participated in the counterterrorism coalition. The Bush Administration designated the PRC-targeted East Turkistan Islamic Movement ETIM as a terrorist organization in August 2002, reportedly allowed PRC interrogators access to Uighur detainees at Guantanamo in September 2002, and held a summit in Texas in October 2002.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE