Accession Number:

ADA509113

Title:

The Militarization of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSL Issue Paper, Volume 6-09, July 2009)

Descriptive Note:

Issue paper

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA CENTER FOR STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

7.0

Abstract:

Russia has reenergized its efforts to evolve the Collective Security Treaty Organization CSTO from a largely symbolic political organization to a more cohesive militarized security alliance. At the forefront of these efforts is a Russian-led plan to create a new CSTO Rapid Reaction Force RRF and a larger Central Asian Military Group. While both initiatives are still in the initial phase of development, the militarization of the CSTO alliance and its transformation into a credible security organization could bolster the Kremlins ability to limit U.S. and Western influence in Eurasia. It could also allow Russia an enhanced ability to increase its control over former Soviet-controlled states and recreate an alliance similar to the Warsaw Pact. The CSTO defense alliance consists of seven member states Russia, Belarus, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. Originally formed in 1992, the purpose of the CSTO is to promote peace, strengthen international and regional security and stability, and ensure the collective defense of the independence, territorial integrity and sovereignty of the member states. Following the August 2008 war with Georgia, Russian President Dmitriy Medvedev called for member nations to increase the military capabilities of the CSTO during a CSTO summit in Moscow when the heads of state agreed to establish a new RRF. This force is designed to meet a wide array of Central Asian security challenges and has a mandate to resist military aggression, conduct special operations to eliminate terrorists and extremists, fight against organized crime and drug trafficking, and respond to natural and industrial disasters. While all of these problems may threaten stability in Central Asia, there are two larger strategic issues driving Russia to militarize the CSTO NATOs continued expansion eastward and the spread of radical Islamic militancy as a result of the growing instability in Afghanistan and northwest Pakistan.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE