Accession Number:

ADA508372

Title:

Making a Quick Call: Compressing Future Military Decision Cycles with Improved Processes and Technology

Descriptive Note:

Research paper

Corporate Author:

MARINE CORPS UNIV QUANTICO VA SCHOOL OF ADVANCED WARFIGHTING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2002-05-16

Pagination or Media Count:

22.0

Abstract:

The U.S. military needs to adopt updated decision-making methods that can fully incorporate cognitive technologies to reduce the time requirements of the human participant. Future military operations hold the promise of real-time information gathering and dissemination. Unfortunately, traditional military industrial age decision-making processes are incompatible with this change in the informational landscape. The tempo of military operations will continue to be shackled by the speed of human decision-making unless a significant revision occurs. Military decision cycles need to be updated to make them more time-competitive during the compressed activities of future wars. The U.S. military establishment is following a course to aggressively develop such operational concepts as Network Centric Warfare NCW and Rapid Decisive Operations RDO. These concepts may create an explosion of data inputs that threaten to overwhelm the military decision framework that traditionally has been organized around the human participant. During the 1960s and 1970s, Colonel John R. Boyd, USAF, endeavored to interpret the mental procedure that a combatant employs to defeat his foe. He originated a construct that is now widely known in the military community as the Observation-Orientation-Decision-Action OODA Loop. Much of Boyds theory is the basis for our current military aspirations to conduct NCW and RDO. Both concepts require the U.S. military to maintain an asymmetrical advantage over our potential enemies decision cycles. For this to be realized, the observation-orientation-decision phases of the OODA Loop must be streamlined. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA has sponsored a series of experimentsexercises to develop cognitive technologies that can assist the military decision-maker. These devices support the compression of the decision cycle.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Psychology
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE