Accession Number:

ADA508067

Title:

High-Resolution Global and Basin-Scale Ocean Analyses and Forecasts

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NAVAL RESEARCH LAB STENNIS SPACE CENTER MS OCEAN DYNAMICS AND PREDICTION BRANCH

Report Date:

2009-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

19.0

Abstract:

The feasibility of global ocean weather prediction was just emerging as the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment GODAE began in 1997. Ocean weather includes phenomena such as meandering currents and fronts, the surface mixed layer and sea surface temperature SST, waves, upwelling of cold water, all influencing ocean variables such as temperature T, salinity S, currents, and sea surface height SSH. Adequate real-time data input, computing power, numerical ocean models, data assimilation capabilities, atmospheric forcing, and bathymetricboundary constraints are essential to make such prediction possible. The ocean models dynamically interpolate data in conjunction with data assimilation, convert atmospheric forcing into oceanic responses, and forecast the ocean weather. The results are substantially influenced by ocean model simulation skill and it is advantageous to use an ocean model that is eddy-resolving, not just eddy-permitting. Because the most abundant ocean observations are satellite surface data, and subsurface data are very sparse, downward projection of surface data is a key challenge in ocean data assimilation. The need for accurate prediction of ocean features that are inadequately observed places a major burden on the ocean model, data assimilation, and atmospheric forcing. The sensitivity of ocean phenomena to atmospheric forcing and the time scale for response affect the oceanic data requirements and prediction system design. Outside of surface boundary layers and shallow regions, forecast skill is about one month globally and over many subregions, and is only modestly reduced by using climatological forcing. In addition, global ocean prediction systems must demonstrate the ability to provide initial and boundary conditions to nested regional and coastal models that enhance their predictive skill.

Subject Categories:

  • Physical and Dynamic Oceanography
  • Computer Programming and Software
  • Fluid Mechanics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE