Accession Number:

ADA497375

Title:

Ukraine

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

DEFENSE INST OF SECURITY ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1996-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

14.0

Abstract:

Tarac Shevchenko 1814-1861, Ukraines greatest literary figure, is noted for his vast talents in poetry, music, and painting. But he is most revered for his writings on Ukraine in the Ukrainian language, which helped to preserve the culture and the language of the people in the face of a determined program of Russification. The above quote can be found in virtually every school and public institution in Ukraine, and while it provides good advice for every day life, it also reminds Ukrainians to learn from other peoples, but never to forget their own heritage. The world has changed greatly since Shevchenko wrote these words in the 19th Century. One could scarcely predict the future in which during a span of just ten years the Iron Curtain would dissolve, the Soviet Union would cease to exist, and in its place would be 15 new independent states with which the United States would enjoy entirely different relations. Of these new nations, Ukraine has rapidly emerged as a key player in many U.S. foreign policy activities. For many Americans, Ukraine is an unknown country. Others are inclined to assume it is a part of its larger neighbor to the north, Russia. Still others call to mind the fierce horseback Cossacks depicted in Gogals classic novella Taras Bulba. Those that do know something of Ukraine may not be aware that the United States and Canada each possess large populations of the Ukrainian Diaspora, concentrated mainly in the northeast and along the U.S.-Canada border.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE