Accession Number:

ADA496988

Title:

An Activity-Based Non-Linear Regression Model of Sopite Syndrome and its Effects on Crew Performance in High-Speed Vessel Operations

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

101.0

Abstract:

The Navys future use of shallow-draft high-speed vessels has provoked questions regarding the effects of resulting ship motion on crews performance. Sopite syndrome, a commonly overlooked subset of motion sickness, is responsible for lethargy, fatigue, drowsiness, difficulty concentrating and numerous other performance-diminishing symptoms in shipboard crewmembers who appear to be adapted to vessel motion Graybiel Knepton, 1976. Since its discovery in 1976, no physically measurable parameter to quantify Sopite syndrome and its effect on performance has been established. Recent efforts to develop high-speed shallow-draft vessels coupled with increased automation and reduced manning place a premium on every crewmember. The manning modifications make it more important than ever to ensure that personnel readiness and performance degradation are accounted for in manning model calculations. This study quantifies Sopite syndrome by using non-linear regression to model activity as a function of time underway and linear regression to model performance. Performance is modeled using the concept of daily activity levels concurrently with ships motion data, individual demographics and motion sickness questionnaires as input parameters. It was found that over an eight-day underway period, performance on a three-minute manual dexterity task degraded by 2 to 3 percent due to Sopite syndrome.

Subject Categories:

  • Stress Physiology
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Marine Engineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE