Accession Number:

ADA496691

Title:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 7, Number 2, February 2001

Descriptive Note:

Monthly rept.

Corporate Author:

ARMED FORCES HEALTH SURVEILLANCE CENTER SILVER SPRING MD

Report Date:

2001-02-01

Pagination or Media Count:

17.0

Abstract:

Infectious mononucleosis is an acute infectious illness that is characterized by fever, sore throat, diffuse lymphadenopathy, and fatigue that typically lasts for 1-2 months. It is estimated that more than 90 of classic infectious mononucleosis cases are caused by Epstein-Barr Virus EBV, a member of the herpes virus family. The incubation period is generally 4-6 weeks. EBV is shed in the saliva of infected, but not necessarily symptomatic, carriers. EBV transmission, therefore, can occur when infected individuals kiss or share eating or drinking utensils with immunologically susceptible individuals. In less developed countries, most individuals are infected with EBV as young children. Fortunately, most children have inapparent to mild clinical manifestations of acute EBV infections. In the United States, most individuals have antibodies indicative of prior EBV infections prior to adulthood however, in socioeconomically advantaged subgroups, as many as half of young adults may be immunologically susceptible to EBV. In 1970, a review of the epidemiology of infectious mononucleosis among US service members was conducted. The report described significant variability in hospitalization rates across Services, over time, and in relation to assignment locations.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Microbiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE