Accession Number:

ADA496531

Title:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 8, Number 4, June 2002

Descriptive Note:

Monthly rept.

Corporate Author:

ARMED FORCES HEALTH SURVEILLANCE CENTER SILVER SPRING MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2002-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

17.0

Abstract:

There are three critical determinants of heat associated injury risk environmental conditions temperature and humidity intensity of physical activity and individual characteristics e.g., hydration status, physical fitness, underlying health. Heat associated injuries are a significant threat to military populations because of frequent occupational exposures to strenuous physical activities in hot and humid environments. The most serious heat-associated injury is heat stroke. Heat stroke is the state of extreme hyperthermia that occurs when the bodys ability to dissipate heat is overwhelmed. Heat stroke signs and symptoms include headache, weakness, loss of consciousness, hot dry skin, high body temperature, rapid pulse, and multi-organ system failure. Heat stroke can be fatal without immediate and definitive medical intervention. Other heat-associated injuries include heat exhaustion and heat cramps which result from excessive fluid and electrolyte depletion. Because heat injuries are preventable, it is useful to identify factors associated with increased risk. Previous summaries reported in the MSMR have identified correlates of risk of heat-associated injury among service members including summer season, younger age, female gender, recent enrollment in the military, and enlisted rank. Two MSMR reports documented higher rates among Hispanic personnel, while a third noted higher rates among Asian and Native American soldiers.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE