Accession Number:

ADA496307

Title:

Department of Homeland Security Assistance to States and Localities: A Summary and Issues for the 111th Congress

Descriptive Note:

Congressional rept.

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-02-26

Pagination or Media Count:

29.0

Abstract:

In light of lessons learned from the September 2001 terrorist attacks and other catastrophes, such as Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav, the 111th Congress is expected to consider questions and issues associated with federal homeland security assistance. Federal homeland security assistance, for the purpose of this report, is defined as U.S. Department of Homeland Security programs that provide funding, training, or technical assistance to states, localities, tribes, and other entities to prepare for, respond to, and recover from man-made and natural disasters. Since the nation is still threatened by terrorist attacks and natural disasters, the 111th Congress may wish to consider questions and challenges about whether, or how, federal homeland security assistance policy should be revisited. Policy solutions could affect, and be constrained by, existing law and regulations, and constitutional considerations. Since FY2002, Congress has appropriated over 29 billion for homeland security assistance to states, specified urban areas and critical infrastructures such as ports and rail systems, the District of Columbia, and U.S. insular areas. Originally, in FY2002, there were eight programs in FY2009 there are 17 programs. This expansion and scope of homeland security assistance programs are the result of congressional and executive branch actions. The Grant Program Directorate, within FEMA, administers these programs for the Department of Homeland Security. Each assistance program has either an all-hazards purpose or a terrorism preparedness purpose. However, in FY2009, 61 of funding has been appropriated for terrorism preparedness programs, a decision which has been criticized by some grant recipients, Members of Congress, and others. This report summarizes these programs, and identifies and analyzes potential issues for the 111th Congress.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Government and Political Science
  • Civil Defense
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE