Accession Number:

ADA496228

Title:

Security Assistance and Counternarcotics Operations in Bolivia

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

5.0

Abstract:

Historically, U.S. security assistance programs in Bolivia have had similar objectives to those in many other countries, i.e., to provide the armed forces with surplus or outdated U.S. equipment through grants or credit purchases. In the past, the Bolivian Army obtained jeeps, trucks, 75mm howitzers, and personal weapons M-1, Colt 45, etc, while the Air Force FAB received aircraft such as the C-47, C-54, and F-86F. The FAB also had an extensive training program with the U.S. Air Force through the Inter-American Air Forces Academy IAAFA as well as through formal schools such as those which provide pilot training. In 1989, President Bush identified the Andean ridge countries of Bolivia, Colombia, Peru and, to a lesser extent, Ecuador, as major partners in his drive to stem the flow of illegal narcotics to the U.S. He and the Congress dramatically re-shaped and increased funding for traditional economic and military aid programs to hit directly at the source of drugs the programs also served to augment strengthened police forces, and Drug Enforcement Agency DEA and military forces within the CONUS. President Bush outlined his objectives through National Security Directive No. 18, the Bennett Plan, and in documents released after the Cartegena Summit in Bolivia in early 1990. This article will address recent changes in the security assistance programs offered through DOD and their application in pursuit of these new national objectives.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE