Accession Number:

ADA488044

Title:

The Principles of War: Sense or Nonsense in the Cold War?

Descriptive Note:

Essay

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1966-04-22

Pagination or Media Count:

24.0

Abstract:

The problem in understanding and explaining the Cold War appears to be one of first appreciating the fact that it is a real war and then selecting commonly accepted and understood principles for analysis and application. It is therefore considered useful to consider the principles of war to determine their applicability to the protracted conflict in which the Free World and the Communist Bloc are now engaged. The principles of war through the ages have been many and varied, followed and ignored, accepted and denied. The United States Army today teaches nine principles. These nine principles can be used to analyze and define the progress of the Cold War in Europe, in Africa, in South America, and in Asia. They are a handy tool to compare Free World and Communist Bloc strategy in different geographical areas and in the political, economic, and military phases of the worldwide Cold War. The principles have definite application in the Cold War. With isolated exceptions the principles are now being followed in the different theatres of the Cold War and in the active campaigns now in progress. That the principles are being applied intuitively in some cases rather than with conscious perception does not detract from their validity. Not only do the principles make sense in the Cold War, they can serve a most useful purpose in helping to make sense out of it.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE