Accession Number:

ADA482943

Title:

Doing Something: Mandates for the Use of Force by the United Nations in Peace Operations Since the End of the Cold War

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2008-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

120.0

Abstract:

The end of the Cold War brought a period of prosperity with expectations for peace, broken by a new kind of small and protracted conflicts. Western powers, freed from the former threat, were eager to commit military units in peace operations. The United Nations UN developed a new concept for the use of force. This concept extended the role of peacekeeping to include humanitarian assistance, conflict solving and nation building. Two case studies especially reflect this new concept Somalia and the former Yugoslavia. Both cases ended in failure for the UN because the mandates exceeded forces capabilities and authorization to use the force. Political direction was lousy, just do something. Both cases have been broadly studied this thesis provides a detailed look at the mandates for the use of force from a military perspective and how military commanders implemented it. Those mandates reflected the instinctive positions of civilian and military decision makers in a new world order. Their impulses are likely to appear again in the future the lessons learned from those conflicts should help to shed light on a better use of force in peace operations.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE