Accession Number:

ADA482620

Title:

Physiological Response and Habituation of Endangered Species to Military Training Activities: SERDP 2006 Annual Report

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER CHAMPAIGN IL CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING RESEARCH LAB

Report Date:

2008-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

54.0

Abstract:

Effects of transient human disturbance on avian species is a concern on Department of Defense installations that support populations of federally listed endangered birds. Military training often is conducted within habitats that support endangered bird species, thus exposing individuals of these species to harassment as defined under the Endangered Species Act ESA of 1973. During the 2006 breeding season on Fort Hood, Texas, evaluations of two major physiological response systems determined response in passerine species to disturbances characteristic of military training activities a hormonal adrenocortical response to stress in white-eyed vireos and endangered black-capped vireos, and energy expenditure as measured by remotely monitored heart rate in white-eyed vireos. Heart-rate radio telemetry was used to measure avian metabolic demands in response to potential stressors related to military training. This study is the first to demonstrate that 1 heart-rate transmitters can successfully be mounted on small 10-g migratory passerines, 2 heart rate can be continuously monitored and recorded in these birds for at least 60 hours, and 3 heart rate is a robust measure of energy expenditure in small passerines and therefore is a powerful method to test the effects of military activity on survival in species of concern.

Subject Categories:

  • Biology
  • Ecology
  • Stress Physiology
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE