Accession Number:

ADA478928

Title:

Cooperative Security: New Horizons for International Order

Descriptive Note:

Occasional paper no. 3

Corporate Author:

GEORGE C MARSHALL CENTER APO AE 09053 EUROPEAN CENTER FOR SECURITY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2001-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

81.0

Abstract:

This paper presents two different approaches to the topic of Cooperative Security. Both are controversial. Richard Cohen presents a compelling and highly original model of Cooperative Security -- a term that once was applied almost exclusively to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe OSCE. Cohen advocates concrete steps for translating this idealistic but vague concept into reality, contending that NATO has become the worlds best example of a Cooperative Security organization. He argues that NATO remains a Collective Defense system, to the extent that it focuses on external threats, but only in part. In addition, NATO has acted as a Collective Security organization -- restoring international stability first in Bosnia Herzegovina and then in Kosovo -- on behalf of the United Nations, when possible, but without United Nations approval, when necessary. Cohen explores all of these diverse functions, presenting his own, normative vision of how NATO should develop in the future, as a Cooperative Security institution, and urging closer contact between NATO, the European Union, and Russia. Cohen notes, however, that the breadth of...Cooperative Security is probably limited by a lack of core values and...common geo-strategic interests. Michael Mihalka traces the history of Cooperative Security organizations, arguing that they date from the early 19th century and extending the concept to include the Association of Southeast Asian Nations ASEAN. Mihalka points out that many members of OSCE and ASEAN are quasi-authoritarian or transitional democracies, not consolidated liberal democracies. He warns that nondemocratic countries are limited in their ability to pursue cooperation and thus argues that the future success of Cooperative Security depends not only on spreading liberal democracy, but also on intensifying economic ties with nondemocratic countries and fostering their sense of a security community that serves the interests of all its members.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE