Accession Number:

ADA478864

Title:

Countering the Ideological Support for HT and the IMU: The Case of the Ferghana Valley

Descriptive Note:

Occasional paper no. 3

Corporate Author:

GEORGE C MARSHALL CENTER APO AE 09053 EUROPEAN CENTER FOR SECURITY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

26.0

Abstract:

The Ferghana Valley consists of portions of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. The chief problems of that Valley include the absence of democracy, the presence of acute economic underdevelopment, and a high degree of repression. These conditions are generally considered to be contributing to the popularity of extremist movements. Two such organizations are the focus of this study Hizb ut-Tahrir-e-Islami or Hizb Tahrir the Islamic Liberation Movement or HT, and the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan IMU. HT is a radical Islamist party, but it is not Jihadist in orientation. Its purpose is to establish the Caliphate Khilafah in Central Asia and elsewhere in the world of Islam. The proposition of creating a Caliphate is a radical one however, HT insists that it intends to achieve its purpose through peaceful means only. The IMU is a pan-Islamist and Jihadist party. As such, it intends to overthrow the governments of the Ferghana Valley through violent means i.e., through the use of militant Jihad. Indeed, it has exploited the repressive governing style of the governments and the acute economic underdevelopment of the area to launch a number of armed attacks in those countries in the late 1990s and 2000. The US involvement in Central Asia in the 1990s has been sporadic, and has not been guided by a coherent strategy. It was only after the terrorist attacks on its homeland on September 11, 2001, that the United States decided to seek the establishment of military bases in the region. Even then, the administration of President George W Bush was not focused on developing a coherent counterterrorism strategy that encompassed Central Asia and Afghanistan. This study sketches out a counterterrorism strategy for the United States in the Ferghana Valley. In essence, such a strategy should be called an anti-terrorism strategy, because it is much more comprehensive than Americas present counterterrorism emphasis that drives its global war on terrorism.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Humanities and History
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE