Accession Number:

ADA478808

Title:

Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Descriptive Note:

Congressional rept.

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2008-02-15

Pagination or Media Count:

71.0

Abstract:

U.S. and outside assessments of the effort to stabilize Afghanistan are mixed and subject to debate the Administration notes progress on reconstruction, governance and security in many areas of Afghanistan. However, a November 2007 Bush Administration review of U.S. efforts in Afghanistan reportedly concluded that overall progress was inadequate, and a number of efforts to augment the U.S. stabilization effort are underway or under further consideration. Outside assessments have tended toward more pessimism, emphasizing a growing sense of insecurity in areas previously considered secure, more suicide bombings, and growing aggregate poppy cultivation, as well as increasing divisions within the NATO alliance about the relative share of combat among the nations contributing to the peacekeeping mission. Politically, the post-Taliban transition was completed with the convening of a parliament in December 2005 a new constitution was adopted in January 2004, successful presidential elections were held on October 9, 2004, and parliamentary elections took place on September 18, 2005. To help stabilize Afghanistan, the United States and partner countries are deploying a 42,000 troop NATO-led International Security Assistance Force ISAF that now commands peacekeeping throughout Afghanistan, including the restive south. Of those, 15,000 of the 27,000 U.S. forces in Afghanistan are part of ISAF the remainder are under direct U.S. command. The U.S. and partner forces also run regional enclaves to secure reconstruction Provincial Reconstruction Teams, PRTs, and are building an Afghan National Army and National Police. The United States has given Afghanistan over 23 billion appropriated, including FY2008 to date since the fall of the Taliban, including funds to equip and train Afghan security forces. About 1.05 billion in economic aid is requested for FY2009. Breakdowns are shown in the several tables at the end of this paper.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Geography
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE