Accession Number:

ADA478771

Title:

Technical Findings, Lessons Learned, and Recommendations Resulting from the Helios Prototype Vehicle Mishap

Descriptive Note:

Conference paper

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMIN LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER HAMPTON VA

Report Date:

2007-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

19.0

Abstract:

The Helios Prototype was originally planned to be two separate vehicles, but because of resource limitations only one vehicle was developed to demonstrate two missions. One configuration, designated HP01, was designed to operate at extremely high altitudes using batteries and high-efficiency solar cells spread across the upper surface of its 247-foot wingspan. The other configuration, designated HP03, was designed for long-duration flight. The plan was to use the solar cells to power the vehicles electric motors and subsystems during the day and to use a modified commercial hydrogen air fuel cell system for use during the night. The aircraft design used wing dihedral, engine power, elevator control surfaces, and a stability augmentation and control system to provide aerodynamic stability and control. At about 30 minutes into the second flight of HP03, the aircraft encountered a disturbance in the way of turbulence and morphed into an unexpected, persistent, high dihedral configuration. As a result of the persistent high dihedral, the aircraft became unstable in a very divergent pitch mode in which the airspeed excursions from the nominal flight speed about doubled every cycle of the oscillation. The aircrafts design airspeed was subsequently exceeded and the resulting high dynamic pressures caused the wing leading edge secondary structure on the outer wing panels to fail and the solar cells and skin on the upper surface of the wing to rip away. As a result, the vehicle lost its ability to maintain lift, fell into the Pacific Ocean within the confines of the U.S. Navys Pacific Missile Range Facility, and was destroyed. This paper describes the mishap and its causes, and presents the technical recommendations and lessons learned for improving the design, analysis, and testing methods and techniques required for this class of vehicle.

Subject Categories:

  • Aerodynamics
  • Pilotless Aircraft
  • Research and Experimental Aircraft

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE