Accession Number:

ADA478030

Title:

Quantifying the Effects of the Influence of a Tungsten Long-rod Projectile into Confined Ceramics at High-velocity Impact

Descriptive Note:

Conference paper

Corporate Author:

ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER WARREN MI

Report Date:

2008-01-29

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

High performance modeling of brittle materials is an efficient, inexpensive, time-saving solution for optimal design of armor systems. Quantifying the effects of high-velocity projectiles into brittle materials provides an armor resolution for the critical need of ballistic protection against lethal threats. The analysis modeled a cylindrical, tungsten carbide blunt projectile into four confined, ceramic materials at a high velocity impact. The finite element simulations were performed using Elastic Plastic Impact Code EPIC Johnson 2006, which simulates the failure and particle breakup of the target once the long-rod penetrator strikes at high-velocity impact. The history of the nose penetration of the projectile will be computed to establish the most advantageous design condition for future vehicle development. Damage computations will also be conducted to demonstrate how the confined, brittle samples behave. The study shows that silicon carbide and boron carbide are the optimal candidates to consider when selecting the best armor performance from the four configurations. A numerical comparison was made between a pyroceram confined and unconfined configuration and ascertains approximately a twelve percent increase in ballistic performance of the confined sample. The computations will offer the researcher data to accurately formulate armor to protect the survivability of the ground vehicle, and most importantly, the soldier.

Subject Categories:

  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Ceramics, Refractories and Glass
  • Armor

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE