Accession Number:

ADA467382

Title:

Navy Ship Propulsion Technologies: Options for Reducing Oil Use - Background for Congress

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-12-11

Pagination or Media Count:

42.0

Abstract:

General strategies for reducing the Navys dependence on oil for its ships include reducing energy use on Navy ships shifting to alternative hydrocarbon fuels shifting to more reliance on nuclear propulsion and using sail and solar power. Reducing energy use on Navy ships. A 2001 study concluded that fitting a Navy cruiser with more energy-efficient electrical equipment could reduce the ships fuel use by 10 to 25. The Navy has installed fuel-saving bulbous bows and stern flaps on many of its ships. Ship fuel use could be reduced by shifting to advanced turbine designs such as an intercooled recuperated ICR turbine. Shifting to integrated electric-drive propulsion can reduce a ships fuel use by 10 to 25 some Navy ships are to use integrated electric drive. Fuel cell technology, if successfully developed, could reduce Navy ship fuel use substantially. Alternative hydrocarbon fuels. Potential alternative hydrocarbon fuels for Navy ships include biodiesel and liquid hydrocarbon fuels made from coal using the Fischer-Tropsch FT process. A 2005 Naval Research Advisory Committee NRAC study and a 2006 Air Force Scientific Advisory Board both discussed FT fuels. Nuclear propulsion. Oil-fueled ship types that might be shifted to nuclear propulsion include large-deck amphibious assault ships and large surface combatants i.e., cruisers and destroyers. A 2005 quick look analysis by the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program concluded that total life-cycle costs for nuclear-powered versions of these ships would equal those of oil-fueled versions when oil reaches about 70 and 178 per barrel, respectively. Sail and solar propulsion. Kite-assisted propulsion might be an option for reducing fuels use on Navy auxiliaries and DOD sea lift ships. Two firms are now offering kite-assist systems to commercial ship operators.

Subject Categories:

  • Non-electrical Energy Conversion
  • Marine Engineering
  • Fuels

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE