Accession Number:

ADA465005

Title:

Coordination of Programs on Domestic Animal Genomics: A Federal Framework

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT WASHINGTON DC NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2003-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

20.0

Abstract:

The Interagency Working Group IWG on Domestic Animal Genomics was chartered in March 2002 to enhance communication and awareness of the importance of domesticated animals, both livestock and companion, as a critical part of the Federal genomics programs. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and U.S. Department of Energy all support programs in genomics, from genome research tools and large-scale genome sequencing to bioinformatics and functional genomics. Domesticated animals play a central role in the food supply as well as biomedical research. With the high quality genome sequences of human, microbes, and plants, as well as other model organisms already available, obtaining similar scientific research resources for both livestock and companion animals will contribute significantly to improvements in the food supply, human health, and the economy. The increased diversity of genomes will allow comparative studies to identify new genes, understand the evolutionary relationships among species, and generate data central to understanding disease susceptibility and food production. Healthier and more efficient livestock impact the safety, security, and abundance of foods. Increased knowledge of domesticated animals commonly used to study human biology and diseases will benefit human health and the development of new pharmaceutical products. With significant input from Federal agencies currently investing in genomics, members of the scientific community, and industry, the IWG outlined a mission and developed a five year framework for Federal support of domestic animal genomics. The framework will facilitate coordination of several agencies to maximize use of resources to produce the genome sequences of the most important domesticated animal species, support data management, bioinformatics, and functional genomics specific for livestock and companion animals.

Subject Categories:

  • Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine
  • Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology
  • Biology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE