Accession Number:

ADA461962

Title:

Gynecologic Cancer Center for Racial Disparities

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 15 Jul 2005-14 Jul 2006

Corporate Author:

HENRY M JACKSON FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MILITARY MEDICINE ROCKVILLE MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

20.0

Abstract:

There are significant health-related disparities in outcome among women in the United States with different types of gynecologic cancer. The authors hypothesize that a poor outcome among minorities with gynecologic cancer exists because of biological differences in tumors related to race and ethnicity cultural, social, and psychological barriers to accessing care less than optimal screening services and prevention strategies and unequal provision of quality health care and tailored therapeutics. To find out more about these issues, the authors will conduct an analysis of the genomic and proteomic expression of gynecologic cancers to determine if there are molecular differences that partially account for the poor outcome among minority patients with gynecologic cancer. This analysis will be expanded in future years to include larger underserved cohorts. The comprehensive epidemiological data that it generates will facilitate more detailed genetic and epigenetic analysis. Epidemiological surveys will be used to identify demographic and behavioral differences that lead to poor outcomes. An evaluation also will be conducted on the use of psychosocial interventions to decrease morbidity among minorities. The authors also will develop vaccine strategies and specific antibody reagents for the detection of unique targets that are differentially expressed between African Americans and Caucasians with endometrial cancer. The incidence, severity, and overall burden of cancer in the United States vary by race, ethnicity, and other demographic features. This project will focus on identifying the reasons underlying poor outcomes among minority groups with gynecologic malignancy so that education, screening, prevention, and treatment algorithms can be tailored to high-risk populations in an effort to have the greatest impact on reducing morbidity and mortality among the underserved.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Psychology
  • Biochemistry
  • Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE