Accession Number:

ADA460774

Title:

The Physiological Effect of Compressive Forces on the Torso

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH INST BETHESDA MD

Report Date:

1946-12-19

Pagination or Media Count:

18.0

Abstract:

Under the stimulus of military aviation the physiological responses of the human body to radial accelerations have been carefully investigated. Until very recently, relatively few investigations have been undertaken to study the physiological problems of linear acceleration. With the advent of jet and rocket propulsion these studies will have added significance. During the earlier phases of the investigation of deceleration, it became apparent that human subjects would have to be used if experimental results were to be applied with any degree of validity to problems incident to aircraft accidents involving large decelerative forces. The impact decelerator fig. 1 has proved to be a useful device in the study of impact forces, which is one aspect of linear acceleration. Early studies with this instrument on the effects of impact forces on human subjects employed the regulation restraining harness composed of seat belt and shoulder straps 1. It was found that the usual level of the subjects tolerance was about 2000 pounds. As impacts exceeded 2000 pounds. As impacts exceeded 2000 pounds, they became increasingly painful. due in part to the relatively narrow harness area which transmits the force to the mid-abdominal and clavicular areas.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE