Accession Number:

ADA459051

Title:

The Complexity of Plasmodium Falciparum Infections in Children in Western Kenya

Descriptive Note:

Doctoral thesis

Corporate Author:

UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD DEPT OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND BIOMETRICS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

102.0

Abstract:

To investigate the allelic complexity of infection COI of Plasmodium falciparum infections in children living in western Kenya, samples from three studies were analyzed. The longitudinal cohort, used to determine the baseline COI, followed 60 children 1-4 years old for 13 months. Results revealed a COI that was dependent on age, parasite density, illness, village location and bed net use. Nearly all infections were with multiple genotypes. Fluctuations of the three examined alleles of msp1, K1, MAD20 and RO33, were rapid and random within individual children, as well as the entire study group, indicating a highly diverse parasite population. Parasite density was found to be directly correlated with COI in those children with clinical illness. As the density increased, the contribution of the K1 allele proportionately increased while the contribution of the RO33 allele decreased. Presence of the invariable RO33 allele was also found to be mildly protective against clinical illness. For the first time, bed net use was found to decrease COI in 1-2 year old children who were both asymptomatic carriers of parasites and ill with clinical malaria the RO33 allele was again most associated with the decrease in COI. In the phase 1 dose-escalation trial with 135 children, those participants who received the full vaccine dose had a decrease in COI following vaccine administration. In that group of children, the RO33 allele was identified in much greater prevalence following vaccine administration. Samples that were RO33 positive were also predominately chloroquine sensitive. The phase 2 vaccine trial with 400 participants is still currently blinded initial analysis showed an increased COI in ill patients, a finding that contrasts with previous reports. Combined, the three studies provided evidence of the rapidly evolving immunity to malaria, even within the limited 1-4 year age range of the study participants.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Microbiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE