Accession Number:

ADA456194

Title:

Application of the SAM Computer Program for Truckee River Stable Channel Analysis

Descriptive Note:

Technical note

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS COASTAL AND HYDRAULICS LAB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

15.0

Abstract:

The purpose of this Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note CHETN is to demonstrate the utility of the SAM computer programs for evaluating the stability of a stream restoration design on the Truckee River. SAM is an integrated system of computer programs developed under the Flood Damage Reduction and Stream Restoration Research Program sponsored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers USACE 2000. These programs are designed to satisfy the need for an easy-to-use methodology for use in preliminary screening of alternatives. It is intended to be used primarily as an aid in the design of stable channels. The SAM package enables the user to evaluate the hydraulics, sediment transport, and sediment yield for representative stream cross sections. The programs are not considered to be a model in the sense of evaluating the hydraulics and sediment transport characteristics of an entire stream reach. The sediment transport algorithms in SAM do not compute bed elevation change erosion and deposition, only sediment transport capacity based on computed hydraulics. For this example, the SAM programs are applied to the Truckee River near Reno, NV. The Truckee River flows from its source, Lake Tahoe, to Pyramid Lake, over a distance of approximately 100 miles. The example restoration reach is located approximately 11 miles downstream of Reno and has a length of approximately 5 miles. The existing channel in this area is characterized by a predominantly gravel and cobble bed, with a slope of approximately 0.0017. The channel bank full widths generally vary from 100-300 ft. Flood-control practices channel straightening activities have changed the channel from a meandering plan form to a relatively straight reach. These efforts combined with resulting bed degradation deepening of the channel invert have resulted in less frequent overbank flows.

Subject Categories:

  • Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
  • Computer Programming and Software

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE