Accession Number:

ADA455301

Title:

Instructional Features for Training in Virtual Environments

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. Jul 2002-Dec 2005

Corporate Author:

ARMY RESEARCH INST ORLANDO FL SIMULATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH UNIT

Report Date:

2006-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

74.0

Abstract:

The U.S. Army has made a substantial commitment to using simulations for training and readiness. Many current simulators are networked and designed to provide realistic training for large combined arms groups of vehicles and major weapon systems. These simulators represent dismounted Soldier activities, but are not intended to directly train or rehearse individual dismounted Soldiers. Virtual Environment VE technology, which typically includes head-mounted visual displays with tracking devices for limbs and individual weapons, provides increasing capabilities that enable a more immersed, person-centered simulation and training capability for dismounted Soldiers. These systems are being investigated so as to include individual dismounted Soldiers in the larger networked simulation system, and to support training and rehearsal for dismounted Soldiers. One research challenge arising from these efforts is identifying and quantifying the effects of VE system characteristics and use on learning, retention, and transfer of skills required for Army tasks. This report describes one experiment in an ongoing program of research conducted by the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences ARI, Simulation Systems Research Unit SSRU that addresses the use of VE technology for training dismounted Soldiers in simulations. This experiment investigated the effects of different supplemental stimuli for directing attention and providing task guidance during repeated performance in virtual simulation exercises. The findings from this research will be used to recommend VE characteristics and instructional methods for incorporation in distributed VE simulation systems for training. SSRU conducts research with the goal of providing information that will improve the effectiveness of training simulators and simulations. The work described here is a part of ARI Research Task 233, VICTOR Virtual Individual and Collective Training for Objective Force Warrior.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Computer Programming and Software
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE