Accession Number:

ADA453994

Title:

Evaluation of Potential JHSV Port and Alternative Offload Sites in Coastal North Carolina

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS COASTAL AND HYDRAULICS LAB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

60.0

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate conventional port and nonconventional offload sites for the Joint High Speed Vessel JHSV in coastal North Carolina, and compare the potential throughput rates at these sites to throughput rates typical of Joint Logistics over the Shore JLOTS operations conducted in exercises in Camp Lejeune. North Carolina was selected as a test site both due to its proximity to Camp Lejeune and also because of its environmental geomorphic similarity to many coastal regions in Asia. Another goal was to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of maps, bathymetry data, and aerial photography from various sources to conduct offload alternatives studies with the intent of eventually applying these techniques to other overseas sites. The analysis of offload sites demonstrated that the total length of shoreline suitable for the JHSV to unload in North Carolina was surprisingly limited. In the Cape Fear River estuary, the total length accessible either directly or via 180-m causeway was 27.9 km in Morehead CityBeaufort area, 5.4 km and in Masonboro Inlet, 1.0 km. The reasons for the limited access are both geological and developmental. On this low-gradient, soft sediment, trailing edge coast, only these three inlets are dredged deep enough to accommodate the JHSV, which requires a channel of 4.6 m. Once within the inlets, the only water deep enough for the JHSV is in the dredged navigation channels and some naturally-deep areas near the mouth of the Cape Fear River. Finally, offload sites must be within a suitable distance from paved roads or railroads in this analysis, 150 m, and these sites, too, proved to be unexpectedly limited. Despite the flexibility of the JHSV, planners considering operations in lesser developed parts of the world will have to contend with even more limited infrastructure, along with geological and oceanographic constraints.

Subject Categories:

  • Information Science
  • Marine Engineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE