Accession Number:

ADA445585

Title:

A Performance Analysis of Routing Protocols for ad-hoc Networks

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

112.0

Abstract:

A mobile ad-hoc network MANET is an autonomous system of mobile nodes connected by wireless links. The performance of MANET is related to the efficiency of the routing protocols in adapting to frequently changing network topology and link status. This thesis addresses the issue by comparing the relative performance of three key ad-hoc routing protocols Destination-sequenced Distance Vector DSDV, Ad-hoc On-demand Distance Vector AODV and Optimized Link State Routing OLSR. The protocols are tested based on two scenarios, namely, tactical networks for ships and sensor-based network nodes. The objective is to validate the scalability and effectiveness of the protocols. Four performance metrics were measured by varying the maximum speed of mobile hosts, network size and traffic load, to assess the routing capability and protocol efficiency. The simulation results indicate that AODV performs better than OSLR and DSDV in the first scenario. Although OLSR also performed relatively well, the associated high routing overhead is the dominant reason for not choosing it. On the other hand, OLSR emerged as the protocol of choice for sensor networks, where the high routing overhead is counteracted by consistently better performance in all other metrics. Due to the slow evolution of the sensor network topology, OLSR performed satisfactorily for best effort traffic but needed subtle adjustments to balance between latency and bandwidth to meet the requirements of delay-sensitive applications. Lastly, default parameters of OLSR were tweaked and recommendations were made with results that showed promising ways to further improve the performance of OLSR in sensor networks, albeit not as significantly as in the tactical networks for the ship case.

Subject Categories:

  • Computer Systems
  • Radio Communications

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE