Accession Number:

ADA445355

Title:

Effect of Increased Operational Tempo (Post 9/11) on the Retention of Navy Medical Corps Officers

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

105.0

Abstract:

This thesis seeks to determine if increased OPTEMPO has a significant effect on the retention behavior of Navy physicians. Demographic and military experience variables were used to construct logistic difference-in-difference DID regression models to evaluate the behavior of General Medical Officers GMOs and specialists making continuation decisions before and after Operation Iraqi Freedom. Although the groups were similar across time, the DID models illustrate a diverging impact of deployments on continuation after the OPTEMPO increased. The DID model indicates that GMOs affected by increased OPTEMPO were significantly less likely to continue. Continuation was also hindered by being black, being Hispanic, and being single with dependents. Factors promoting continuation included years of service, being a flight surgeon, being an Undersea Medicine physician, and being a member of a raceethnicity group other than white, black, or Hispanic. Similarly, the DID model indicates that specialists who deployed after the OPTEMPO increased had a substantially higher probability of separation. The probability for leaving was increased for specialists who are not in primary care. The probability of continuation was higher for individuals with more years of service, those single without dependents, those deployed before the OPTEMPO increased, and those assigned to Naval Medical Center, San Diego.

Subject Categories:

  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE