Accession Number:

ADA445096

Title:

U.S. Security Policy in South Asia Since 9/11 - Challenges and Implications for the Future

Descriptive Note:

Occasional paper series

Corporate Author:

ASIA-PACIFIC CENTER FOR SECURITY STUDIES HONOLULU HI

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2005-02-01

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

US security ties to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India have burgeoned since the United States launched its war on terrorism in South Asia after 911 but this trend may prove self-limiting. In Afghanistan, the issue of counterterrorism cooperation remains secondary to the survival of the new Western-backed political order which is threatened by resurgent elements of the Taliban by warlords and local militia commanders by the booming drug trade and by the potential renewal of meddling in Afghanistan by neighboring powers such as Pakistan and Iran. US-Pakistani relations remain narrowly based on counterterrorism and somewhat troubled, despite increasingly effective tactical cooperation against militants. President Musharrafs counterterrorism cooperation with the United States continues to exacerbate tensions within Pakistan, many of whose regional priorities are at odds with Washingtons. US-Pakistani cooperation could be disrupted by domestic political opposition or by a terrorist attack on US interests originating in Pakistan. US-Indian ties, too, have expanded since 911, chiefly in the area of military-to-military relations the warming trend is likely to continue, particularly if private sector economic relations really do take off-but differences between Washington and New Delhis strategic visions are likely to limit their international partnership.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE