Accession Number:

ADA443815

Title:

The Thermoregulatory Consequences of Heat Stroke: Are Cytokines Involved

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

ARMY RESEARCH INST OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE NATICK MA THERMAL AND MOUNTAIN MEDICINE DIVISION

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

The thermoregulatory changes induced by prolonged heat exposure consist of hyperthermia in response to direct heat exposure and a biphasic response consisting of hypothermia followed by fever which develops during long-term recovery. This review discusses the importance of these thermoregulatory responses for prediction of heat stroke morbidity and mortality and the potential role of endogenous cytokines in the regulation of these responses. Current data suggest that the magnitude and duration of hypothermia is directly related to severity of the heat insult, whereas fever is a biomarker of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome SIRS that ensues during heat stroke recovery. Correlation studies showing elevated cytokine concentrations in human and animal heat stroke models suggest an adverse role of these substances in heat-induced SIRS, although few neutralization studies have been conducted to support this hypothesis. Preliminary results from cytokine and cytokine receptor knockout mice suggest that cytokines may not be involved in the thermoregulatory response to heat stroke, but in some cases appear to have a protective, permissive role for heat stroke survival.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE