Accession Number:

ADA443624

Title:

Bone Marrow Function in Development of Childhood Asthma

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 28 Feb 2002-27 Mar 2005

Corporate Author:

WEST VIRGINIA UNIV MORGANTOWN

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2005-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

18.0

Abstract:

Asthma is the most common reason for hospitalization of children in both military and civilian hospitals. In children with asthma, pulmonary exposure to allergen results in damage to bronchioles by invasion of eosinophils. Eosinophils are inflammatory cells, have limited life spans, and must be continually renewed from hematopoietic tissue. We adapted an animal model of asthma to our laboratory for studies of the effect of pulmonary allergen exposure on eosinophil progenitor cells CFU-eo. These studies have revealed that CFU-eo numbers are elevated in the bone marrow of asthmatic mice following pulmonary allergen exposure. IL-S is the primary cytokine that regulates eosinophil production and was originally thought to be synthesized exclusively by T lymphocytes. Cytokines such as IL-S, SCF, IL-4 and leukotrienes also influence eosinophil production during the onset of asthma and these cytokines originate from bone marrow stromal cells. We have determined that both stromal cells and T lymphocytes have a contributory role in both normal and accelerated eosinophil production noted in asthma. In addition, inflammatory mediators released from the lung alter stromal cell support of eosinophilopoiesis and this altered response may contribute to the chronic inflammation associate with long term asthma.

Subject Categories:

  • Biochemistry
  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE