Accession Number:

ADA440836

Title:

The Ineffective and Unchanging Drug Strategy

Descriptive Note:

/hoffman

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL WAR COLL WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

President Bush announced his National Drug Control Strategy on September 5, 1989. It emphasized a multinational and multi-agency approach to attack both the supply and demand aspects of illegal drug use in the United States. On September 18, 1989, Secretary of Defense SecDef Cheney issued implementing counterdrug strategy for the Department of Defense DoD. He determined that a principal foreign policy objective is the reduction, and if possible, elimination of the flow of illegal narcotic substances into the US. Based upon this finding, in combination with DoDs statutory responsibilities to support law enforcement agencies, he identified the countering of the production, trafficking, and use of illegal drugs as a high priority national security mission. At almost the exact same time that the war against drugs heated up, the cold war ended. Soon after SecDef announced his drug strategy, the Berlin wall tumbled down. The cold war and DoDs war on drugs share a common strategy they both rely on the security assistance program to achieve their goals. Security assistance in the cold war was largely successful, but in spite of best intentions, it has not been successful as a strategy in DoDs drug war. Its continued use is based not upon a rational policy, but rather on organizational process and bureaucratic politics.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Sociology and Law
  • Pharmacology
  • Military Intelligence

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE