Accession Number:

ADA433484

Title:

Non-Invasive Methods for Determining Lesion Depth From Vesicant Exposure

Descriptive Note:

Conference paper

Corporate Author:

ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF CHEMICAL DEFENSE ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD NEUROTOXICOLOGY BRANCH

Report Date:

2004-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

3.0

Abstract:

Before sulfur mustard injuries can be effectively treated assessment of lesion depth must occur. Accurate depth assessment is important, because it dictates how aggressive treatment needs to be to minimize or prevent cosmetic and functional deficits. Depth of injury is typically assessed by physical examination. Diagnosing very superficial and very deep lesions is relatively easy for the experienced burn surgeon. Lesions of intermediate depth, however, are often problematic in determining the need for grafting. This study was a preliminary evaluation of three non-invasive bioengineering methodologies, reflectance colorimetry RC, laser Doppler perfusion imaging LDPI and indocyanine green fluorescence imaging ICGFI, to determine their ability to accurately diagnose depth of sulfur mustard lesions in a weanling swine model. Six female animals 8-12 kg were exposed to 400 l of neat sulfur mustard on 6 ventral sites for 2, 8, 30, or 60 minutes. This exposure regimen produced lesions of varying depth from superficial to deep dermal. Evaluations of lesion depth using the bioengineering techniques were conducted at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexposure. Following euthanasia at 72 hours postexposure, skin biopsies were taken from each site and processed for routine H E histological evaluation to determine the true depth of the lesion. Preliminary results demonstrated that LDPI figure 1 and ICGFI figure 2 were useful tools to characterize skin perfusion and provided a good estimate of HD lesion depth. The RC data are still being analyzed however, the initial interpretation suggests that the data do not provide useful information concerning lesion depth. A 2-min HD exposure produced a superficial lesion. LDPI and ICGFI showed increase blood flow for the 2-min HD lesion at all observation times. An 8-min HD exposure produced a lesion on intermediate depth with severe diffuse necrosis of the superficial dermis.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Chemical, Biological and Radiological Warfare
  • Biomedical Instrumentation and Bioengineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE