Accession Number:

ADA429324

Title:

The Evaluation of Automated Systems

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-05-26

Pagination or Media Count:

64.0

Abstract:

The end of the 20th century presented the United States Army with a new technological and geopolitical environment. The Army has recognized this change and is adapting to operate in this new environment. It has developed a number of automated tools to assist leaders in the command and control of their organizations. One tool currently being developed, tested, and integrated into the Army is the Combined Arms Planning and Execution Monitoring System CAPES. CAPES is designed to help decision makers develop, coordinate, and produce operational plans. This monograph focuses on the evaluation of the CAPES system. To determine whether CAPES was useful, the author compared two planning efforts that were based on a similar problem. One planning staff used traditional planning tools and the other planning staff had access to CAPES. Early collection and analysis of observations from the two planning groups indicated that the design of the experiment was inadequate to show either the advantages or disadvantages of CAPES. Specific design problems included faults in the scenario selected, organization of the planning staff, and the exercise architecture. Analysis of these problems indicated that greater attention must be placed on selecting scenarios that replicate command and control conditions intended for CAPES. The staff used in the CAPES experiment needed more training with the planning tools and more practice working together. Command and control systems must interconnect and communicate across all Battlefield Automation Systems BAS and staffs must use all of the subsystems simultaneously. The problems identified during this study constitute a set of preventable deficiencies that system designers and evaluators can avoid when conducting software assessments. Incorporating the overlooked design parameters with those of the planned test will lead to a better assessment of automation planning tools in the future. 57 refs.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Computer Programming and Software
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE