Accession Number:

ADA429039

Title:

The 7-Step Model - A Relevant and Ready Tool for the Future Force

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-05-26

Pagination or Media Count:

54.0

Abstract:

The 7-step model of the MDMP is a tried and proven process. However, some critics argue it is not the right decision-making and planning tool for the future force. The 7-step model is a deliberate process requiring a significant amount of time when all of the steps are executed. Naturalistic decision-making theories, like recognition-primed decision-making RPD, are thought to be more applicable for the future force. To determine the relevancy of the 7-step model for the future force, this study first reviewed the purpose of decision-making and various decision-making theories. Next, the Cold War environment and the Contemporary Operating Environment were compared to determine if the environment that the Army operates within has significantly changed. Then, the study applied three criteria, applicability, adherence and joint commonality, to the 7-step model to determine the relevancy of the 7-step model for the future force. Through this research, the 7-step model was determined still applicable for the future force. The deliberate, systematic decision-making models are designed to aid decision-makers when the problems are complex or when the decision-makers are inexperienced. The naturalistic decision-making theories explain how experienced people within their areas of expertise make decisions. The Contemporary Operating Environment is full of uncertainty. The future force is expected to go to battle with an unknown enemy who will use unfamiliar tactics. Additionally, as the Army promotes officers into new positions, regardless of their experience, they are placed in a new situation. The uncertainty of the Contemporary Operating Environment coupled with the various level of experience of military decision-makers support the need for a deliberate process. However, the research did find merit in the recognition-primed decision-making process. The Army should continue to instruct the 7-step model to junior leaders. The Army should also adopt

Subject Categories:

  • Information Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE