Accession Number:

ADA429029

Title:

Homeland Security Strategy from the Cold War into the Global War on Terrorism: An Analysis of Deterrence, Forward Presence, and Homeland Defense

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-06-18

Pagination or Media Count:

138.0

Abstract:

Homeland security was restored as the number one goal of U.S. national security strategy following 911. The evolution of U.S. national security strategy from the Cold War years into the post-911 years demonstrates a historical reliance on three key elements deterrence, forward presence, and homeland defense. Each of these three elements is reviewed to identify external threats to the United States over time. The problem with national security policy after the Cold War was that the threat environment changed and yet U.S. national security strategy did not change. Thus, the central research question of this thesis is as follows What are the inherent strategic weaknesses in homeland security strategy and what are the implications for the future A narrative review of each presidential administration from the Cold War to the 21st Century is provided to show how each affected national defense policy and military posture. The research demonstrates that certain of Americas vulnerabilities endure, including being slow to act internationally, overextending its military forces, perpetuating a false sense of security, and a relying too heavily on deterrence. A bibliography includes 23 books, 8 journal articles, 33 government documents, and 8 other sources. 2 tables, 13 figures

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Intelligence

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE