Accession Number:

ADA428118

Title:

Current and Future Challenges for Asian Nonproliferation Export Controls: A Regional Response

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL STRATEGIC STUDIES INST CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

43.0

Abstract:

Export controls represent one of the key elements of a comprehensive nonproliferation strategy. They include procedures adopted by countries to regulate and monitor trade in weaponry and weapons-related dual-use technologies. However, the effectiveness of export control as a tool for limiting the spread of sensitive technologies and weaponry has been compromised by globalization and a complex array of international developments. The distinction between military and commercial products has become less clear. Therefore, it is likely that export control policies and institutions need to be continually adjusted if they are to serve international security objectives. Regional export control standards are quite varied. For example, over the past 2 years, China passed legislation related to nuclear, chemical and biological, missile, and military exports. Taiwan updated its export regulations with regards to Mainland trade. South Korea implemented a catch-all regulation, and Singapore passed legislation strengthening state control over the export of strategic goods. Other states, such as Laos, Myanmar, and Malaysia, have made only minor changes. How countries in the Asia region respond to the relentlessly changing nature of the proliferation challenge will affect profoundly the shape of global security for many years. In many instances, the countries of the region are major transshipment and assembly points for critical strategic dual-use goods and technologies. Some of these countries are already major producers of strategic items, while others are or have potential to become suppliers. Yet, national export control systems in the region, with a few exceptions, remain rudimentary and resource-poor. The states of Asia could benefit from a regional approach to export control development and coordination and from increased export control cooperation with the United States. A case study of North Korean companies and commercial activities in Southeast Asia is included.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science
  • Nuclear Warfare
  • Nuclear Weapons

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE