Accession Number:

ADA426799

Title:

Ukraine as a Post-Cold War Military Power

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC CENTER FOR COUNTERPROLIFERATION RESEARCH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1997-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Fifteen new independent entities were propelled by national security imperatives to create their own armed forces once the Soviet Union was dissolved. That process varied from state to state because of differences in interests and resources. An instructive example is Ukraine, perhaps the most important of the emergent states after Russia. A country of 52 million people, the size of France, and rich in natural resources, it could be destined to play a central role in the new geopolitical environment of eastern and central Europe. The speed of the Soviet Unions breakup left its forces practically intact where they were deployed. While Russia proper retained the second-rate forces that were previously part of the central strategic reserve, the former republics on the western frontier, especially Ukraine and Belarus, inherited first-class force packages which were part of the second strategic echelon of the Warsaw Pact. Each of the newly independent states has dealt differently with its military inheritance. Ukraine decided to nationalize former Soviet forces stationed on its territory, the first former Soviet republic to do so. Over 700,000 ground, air, and air defense forces along with 500,000 paramilitary troops were based in Ukraine. Motivated by national regional patriotism and economic considerations, most remained and swore allegiance to the new state. Only 20,000 officers departed to Russia or other former republics. As approved by the Supreme Rada, the major tenets of military doctrine are preventing war, building the armed forces, and repelling aggression. This article discusses Ukraines actions to reform the military in the areas of force reduction, military reeducation, force conversion and quality of life, ethnic relations, language of command, civil-military relations, force structure, readiness, and Ukraine-U.S. relations. 1 figure, 5 photographs

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE