Accession Number:

ADA426615

Title:

Managing the U.S.-China Military-to-Military Relationship

Descriptive Note:

Research brief

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

1.0

Abstract:

The United States and China have had a security relationship since 1971, when Henry Kissinger opened the door to cordial relations by sharing intelligence about the Soviet military. Recently, however, disagreements over key issues have led each country to regard the other as a strategic competitor and a potential enemy. For example, China views U.S. military assistance to Taiwan as an effort to undermine Chinas security and its claim to sovereignty over the island. Chinas failure to renounce the use of force against Taiwan -- a policy opposed by the United States -- has further elevated tensions and has even raised the possibility of armed conflict. In 2001 the U.S. Department of Defense began to reassess the U.S.-China relationship to determine the appropriate nature of contact between the two militaries. A RAND Project AIR FORCE PAF study conducted in parallel with this effort recommends a program of security management with three aspects 1 the United States should pursue communication between U.S. and Chinese senior defense and military officials to prevent misperceptions, resolve differences, and deter China from taking actions that are hostile to U.S. interests 2 the United States should pursue improved methods of gathering information about China and its military and 3 the United States and China should continue to cooperate in the global war on terrorism.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Intelligence

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE