Accession Number:

ADA422957

Title:

Adaptive Oceanographic Sampling in a Coastal Environment Using Autonomous Gliding Vehicles

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 1 Jan 2001-31 Dec 2003

Corporate Author:

WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION MA DEPT OF PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2003-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

5.0

Abstract:

The long-term goal of this program is to develop an efficient, mobile, infrastructure-free, ocean-observing system composed of high-endurance, low-cost autonomous vehicles with near-global range and modular sensor payload. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of adaptive sampling strategies and the intelligent control of large glider fleets operating within the framework of an autonomous oceanographic sampling network. The primary objective of the program is to develop and demonstrate moderate-term weeks operation of a multi-vehicle network of autonomous gliders in a coastal environment. Secondary objectives include continued development of adaptive sampling strategies suitable for large fleets of slow-moving autonomous vehicles, and development and implementation of new oceanographic sensors and sampling methodologies. The main task completed was a complete redesign of the vehicle incorporating significant improvements in modularity, capability, and robustness. Major improvements include the addition of a modular science payload bay with a dedicated computer system, integration of acoustic transducers in the bow cone, and addition of a servo-controlled rudder for improved lateral control. A dedicated science computer was implemented to reduce the processing load on the main computer and facilitate the addition of modular sensor packages. Also completed is an integrated glider data management system that has been linked with a web-based front-end for near-real-time data distribution via the internet and a desktop-based mission simulator that allows efficient prototyping of adaptive sampling algorithms and multiple-vehicle interaction. Operations in Tongue of the Ocean Bahamas and Buzzards Bay MA with three vehicles during winter 2002-2003 yielded approximately 350 hours of automated network operation and nearly 3000 vertical profiles of temperature and salinity. Hardware and software improvements have resulted from these field operations.

Subject Categories:

  • Physical and Dynamic Oceanography
  • Submarine Engineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE