Accession Number:

ADA422249

Title:

Capability, Cognition and Autonomy

Descriptive Note:

Conference paper

Corporate Author:

QINETIQ LTD FARNBOROUGH (UNITED KINGDOM) CENTRE FOR HUMAN SCIENCES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2003-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

27.0

Abstract:

A number of fundamental questions and key issues are identified concerning the role of humans in advanced automated and intelligent systems. In particular, there is uncertainty over how to optimize the use of human and computer decision resources while preserving a human-centric system. These matters need to be understood in the context of a changing capability requirement responding to new military problem-solving challenges. Important changes are being made in the way in which military force will be used in the future with the introduction of effects-based approaches to the planning and conduct of joint operations. This will be enabled by network CCII, and will provide shared planning and situation appreciation, command intent, and Combat ID. The prime reason for human involvement in military decision-making seems unquestioned -- human knowledge and experience provides a unique capability to analyze and think ahead in uncertain and novel situations. The challenge is to provide information and decision systems that protect and preserve the human users key role, and that augment and enhance the users cognition rather than replace the user in complex decision making. Recent developments in the theory of cognition provide pragmatic approaches that are likely to improve understanding of the human factors issues, and problems and solutions of human-computer collaboration. In addition, new approaches to the use of automation propose adjustable levels of computer autonomy with a strong socio-technical and cognition basis. These seem likely to provide sensible architectures for distributed, multi-agent intelligent systems that can be more readily appreciated by human users than traditional automation approaches. New applications of PACT to multi-agent CCII are proposed. 6 tables, 7 figures, 39 refs.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Psychology
  • Cybernetics
  • Human Factors Engineering and Man Machine Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE