Accession Number:

ADA416698

Title:

Tools for Evolutionary Acquisition: A Study of Multi-Attribute Tradespace Exploration (MATE) Applied to the Space-Based Radar (SBR)

Descriptive Note:

Master's degree

Corporate Author:

MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2003-07-31

Pagination or Media Count:

149.0

Abstract:

The Multi-Attribute Tradespace Exploration MATE process was applied to the Space-Based Radar SBR, a space system under study by the United States Air Force. A system-level model of possible SBR architectures was created using data and analysis from previous high-level studies. Competing designs were evaluated through MATEs universal utility metric. The MATE model was qualitatively compared against a high-level design study and MATEs advantages were noted, specifically its ability to trace modeling assumptions and present a holistic view of the space of competing designs. A quantitative comparison revealed significant differences between MATEs recommended system design and that of the comparison high-level study. The potential for a simplification of the MATE method was explored through the use of several approximations to reveal user preferences. Comparisons were made through both a proportional utility loss metric and a general Spearmans Rho rank order correlation. Using these measures it was shown that while a linear or subjective approximation to utility curves resulted in excessive errors, approximation to weighting relationships did not. Finally, MATEs potential applicability to the Air Force acquisition process was studied. In general MATE was shown to be useful to any acquisition effort that derives its benefit from a networked approach and is of sufficient technical complexity as to make tradeoff decisions opaque to casual analysis. Specifically, MATE was shown to be useful in the analysis of alternatives as well as an aid to early milestone sourcing decisions. 48 figures, 40 refs.

Subject Categories:

  • Operations Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE