Accession Number:

ADA411537

Title:

U.S. Intervention in Haiti: An Assessment of the International Police Monitoring Program 1994-1995 and Beyond

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI JOINT MILITARY OPERATIONS DEPT

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2002-05-13

Pagination or Media Count:

131.0

Abstract:

In September 1994, President Clinton ordered 20,000 troops to Haiti to force the departure of military rulers led by General Cedras. This act led to the return of elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the restoration of democracy. The intervention included organizing a force of 1,200 people from 20 countries to monitor Haitis police and oversee the transition of a professional law enforcement organization. During this period, some 7,000 members of the functioning military were disbanded and reorganized into a smaller army of 1,500 and an additional unit of 3,000 serving as an Interim Police Force. The Interim Police Force received minimal training, principally in human rights observance and the avoidance of the use of excessive violence, before being placed into service. Their activities were monitored and overseen by International Police Monitors. With a temporary police force in place the IMF set out to implement a well laid out plan for establishing a permanent police force in Haiti - as well as plans for restructuring the criminal justice, traffic control and the prison system. The prototype plan was first implemented in stages in the city of Cap Haitien. Thousands of Haitians applied to become recruits for the new police force in spite of the extremely rigorous and strict selection standards. Selectees received extensive training in ethics, human rights and law enforcement techniques at the National Police Academy. The IPMs played an integral part in the evaluation, training and selection of these recruits. The situation in Haiti was in such disarray that the IPMs did not limit themselves to the activities laid out for them - they saved lives, calmed would be rioters, helped to clean prisons, painted police stations, provided relief for storm victims, etc.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE